FM20 | How To Turn Around a Bad Run

Du Malone writes: I reblog this post because it represents an example of the value of reflective learning on FM. In particular the post faces up to a number of temptations that seem to me, from my consumption of podcasts and other blogs, widespread. These include:

  1. assuming you can just choose a tactic at the start of a save and run with it, as if other teams will never wise up to it;
  2. selecting players on auto-pilot (and as a result lacking ruthlessness);
  3. thinking attributes are all that matters; and
  4. not recognising the value of BOTH continuity and change.

according to FM

Arresting a slide has proven to be one of football managements more difficult tasks. By the time the clocks go back, the board and fans have generally had time to assess the managers performance and decided if they should be under pressure or not. Turning around a bad run of form in FM20 can be the difference between keeping your job, or clicking ‘return from holiday when offered an interview’.

Under the new club vision tab a manager now has the ability to see what they are being judged on, but it also would appear that we are judged on far more areas than before. Be it style of play, on pitch performance or the finances around transfers, each decision we make as a manager can turn the game against us. So why do I start an article by writing about turning around poor form or battling board pressure? Simple…

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Managing your players through contracts: football and stakeholder management

Grigor Pasha writes: Exploration of online content (especially podcasts) on football management suggest that there is a common assumption that contracts are not where it's at. Players, transfers, tactics: yes, they attract attention. But contracts, no. They seem to be consigned to the mental category of 'admin'. Boring. Merely clerical. To any manager who thinks … Continue reading Managing your players through contracts: football and stakeholder management

Assessing strategy for club development: a worked example

Grigor Pasha writes: June 2021. In a couple of previous posts I outlined my managerial strategy. In one I argued that there are two types of football manager -- the hunter-gatherer and the cultivator. I explained that, contrary to my personality, I'd decided that the optimum strategy here at Neftochimic 1962 was the latter. I … Continue reading Assessing strategy for club development: a worked example

There are two types of football manger: which are you?

Grigor Pasha writes: As I explained in my previous post, my club development is to seek to meet the board's expectation of a top-half finish whilst, crucially, giving the youngsters in the squad the opportunity to develop. The agricultural approach to club management This makes me, in my role as manager of Neftochimic 1962, a … Continue reading There are two types of football manger: which are you?

In which a football manager makes a medium-term wager

Grigor Pasha writes: The situation, in my second season here on the Black sea coast with Neftochimic, as I see it is this: in the foreseeable future we're not going to have enough money to buy success. Even though my spending on wages is way below budget, we're losing money every month. The way this … Continue reading In which a football manager makes a medium-term wager

революция (REVOLUTION) IN BULGARIA

Grigor Pasha writes: Given that we outperformed expectation last season, finished second in the Bulgarian second, you might expect me to make little change to the squad. Just strengthen here and there. But I went for radical change instead. My reasoning was: many players' contracts were expiring those whose contracts I wanted most to renew … Continue reading революция (REVOLUTION) IN BULGARIA

A fundamental decision for a football manager: reviewing the squad

Grigor Pasha writes: The arrival of the winter break found Neftochimic in third place, in one of the play-off places in the Bulgarian second tier. I hadn't expected to achieve such a lofty position. The question then was what to do about squad development. Context In most clubs that question would concern whether to strengthen … Continue reading A fundamental decision for a football manager: reviewing the squad

The good, the bad, and the ugly: a tale of three left backs

Grigor Pasha writes: In a previous post I outlined our predicament at left back. Essentially we had three candidates -- Zemyarksi, Ali, and Dimov -- none of them close to ideal. Well, now we've reached the winter break and I reflect on the situation, I realise we've reached a resolution of sorts. I can best … Continue reading The good, the bad, and the ugly: a tale of three left backs

To look at him, you wouldn’t know that the football manager is racked by insecurity

Grigor Pasha writes: It's early October; we've played 10 league matches and are fourth. We're level on points with the leaders, Lokomotive Gorna and we have a game in hand. Why, then, do I spend so much of time feeling racked with insecurity? A tendency to concede late-on is one reason. A bigger one is … Continue reading To look at him, you wouldn’t know that the football manager is racked by insecurity